Treatment of transaction costs

How are the transaction costs treated?

Transaction costs incurred while acquiring a financial asset or incurring a financial liability is treated differently depending upon the classification of such financial asset or financial liability.

Transaction costs include fees and commission paid to agents (including employees acting as selling agents), advisers, brokers and dealers, levies by regulatory agencies and security exchanges, and transfer taxes and duties. Transaction costs do not include debt premiums or discounts, financing costs or internal administrative or holding costs.

For financial assets not measured at fair value through profit or loss, transaction costs are added to the fair value at initial recognition. For financial liabilities, transaction costs are deducted from the fair value at initial recognition. For financial instruments that are measured at amortised cost, transaction costs are subsequently included in the calculation of amortised cost using the effective interest method and, in effect, amortised through profit or loss over the life of the instrument.

For financial instruments that are measured at fair value through other comprehensive income transaction costs are recognised in other comprehensive income as part of a change in fair value at the next re-measurement. If the financial asset is measured, those transaction costs are amortised to profit or loss using the effective interest method and, in effect, amortised through profit or loss over the life of the instrument.

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Criteria for classifying as either financial liability or equity

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